Yellowstone National Park (Part 5)

Yellowstone National Park (Part 5)

July 15, 2015 Categories Camper Van, Road Trips, Travel, USA

We didn’t do anything yesterday and it was great. I finally got to do some reading and finished The Wild Truth, which is a follow-up to Into the Wild. Today was our last day in Yellowstone; mainly because I’m just bored of it and tired of having to spend 2+ hours just to get anywhere in the park. Today was especially irritating because idiots don’t know how to pull off the road to look at wild animals. Instead, they stop right in the middle of the road. And not briefly, either. They stop for several minutes and cause a four mile long line of traffic. What was so important to cause such a delay? A buffalo. Pooping. I really hate how stupid people are.

Anywho, today was dreary and wasn’t that exciting. We drove the entire Eastern road in the park because we’d yet to go up that way. It’s a lot prettier than the West side of the park, scenery-wise, as it’s filled with hillsides, trees, some plains, lakes, and the river. There are several areas where you can pull off to look around, but not as many designated stops as the West side. There was one area in Hayden Valley where we arrived a few minutes too late and missed a chance to see a grizzly bear. There were so many people crowding the area, it’s no wonder he walked off. I’m starting to dislike the idea of focusing on National Parks for this trip. There’s so much traffic and so many people, it kind of defeats the entire point of going to nature to get away from that stuff.

I barely took any pictures today. I honestly don’t even remember where they’re from.

Here’s a video of a “Mud Volcano”:

After finishing The Wild Truth yesterday, I felt I had to watch the movie Into the Wild again. I didn’t catch the reference to Slab City the first couple times I’ve seen that movie, but I’m really interested in it now. Slab City is located in the┬áSonoran Desert and is the site of old WWII barracks; the barracks have long since been gone, but the slabs they were built on remain. There is no electricity, no running water, no toilets, no trash service, and the site is completely uncontrolled. Sounds appealing, right? It does to me.

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